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Introduction here. Spoilers for the Iemitsu (vol 2-4) and Tsunayoshi arcs (vol. 4-6), including the drama and the Ôoku: Eien film. Warnings: the plot of this story arc contains sexual assault and abuse, dubious consent, suicide, murder, and all the back-stabbing. I’ve kept the mostly images PG-13 (there’s a little gore in one) but the content is not safe for work.

"I'm not like the former Shogun, who agreed to anything." Vol. 183.

“I’m not like the former Shogun, who agreed to anything.” Vol. 183.

Brought to you by the Bechdel test

Let’s start with the most obvious point: Tsunayoshi can be a morally reprehensible woman precisely because the Ôoku has equal gender representation, both in her story arc and the work at large. Continue Reading »

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Leah:

Great post introducing intersectional masculinities.

Originally posted on Inequality by (Interior) Design:

By: C.J. Pascoe and Tristan Bridges

gwptwittericon2Originally posted at Girl W/ Pen

coverWhat it means to be masculine changes over time and from place to place.  After all, men used to wear dresses and high heels, take intimate pictures with one another and wear pink in childhood.  In our scholarship and blog posts we have been grappling with making sense of some of these more recent changes as we’ve watched (and contributed to) a discussion about what it means to be an ally and changing views on gender and sexual inequality—primarily among men (see here and here).  We recently published an article thinking through changes in contemporary definitions of masculinity allegedly occurring among a specific population of young, white, heterosexual men.

We sought to make sense of some complex issues like the contradiction between what seems like an “epidemic” of homophobic bullying alongside rising levels of support…

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JATA Ishikawa

While I’m working out some complex thoughts about Tsunayoshi, check out the Japan Association of Travel Agents‘ promotional video with World Order as they travel to my home prefecture of Ishikawa!

Continue Reading »

Spoilers for the Iemitsu (vol 2-4) and  Tsunayoshi arcs (vol. 4-5), including the drama and the Ôoku: Eien film.

I have been thinking about this post for three years.

Vol. 4, p. 123. "Bored! Bored! Bored!" and sick of all her concubines.

Vol. 4, p. 123. “Bored! Bored! Bored!” and sick of all her concubines.

Initially, when I finished reading the Iemitsu-Arikoto story arc (see here for manga and here for drama recaps), I was emotionally raw. Continue Reading »

Yes, JET alum Tim Martin interviewed Jim Breen, creator of WWWJDIC, one of the most popular online Japanese dictionaries, which revolutionized Japanese-language learning technology. This was the first dictionary I used, and while I tend to use Space ALC for helping localize phrases (often to hilarious effect), WWWDIC’s multi-radical kanji and text glossing have been key tools for many of the English-speaking JSL learners of my generation.

Photo courtesy of Jim Breen. Via JETWit.

Photo courtesy of Jim Breen. Via JETWit.

Continue Reading »

In this edition of the gender reader: queer issues in the Tohoku Disaster recovery, the Global Gender Gap Report 2013, why the “economics of sex” video is wrong, wrong, wrong, and more!

3 out of 4 women agree: "Not a feminist? Get out of my bed." (Via Business Insider, originally from The Economics of Sex)

Let’s reclaim this image. “Sorry, bro, the goddesses have spoken. Misogynists don’t get sex OR vintage NES time.” (Via Business Insider, originally from The Economics of Sex by the Austin Institute)

Continue Reading »

Leah:

A look the concepts of “semi-adapting” and racial place in society and in immigrant communities for a Nikkei Peruvian who migrated to Japan.

Originally posted on JAPANsociology:

by Robert Moorehead

In all social processes, you have to have the word ‘inclusion’. … without that word, I’m not going to change the world, and they’re not going to change me, because they’re going to have that culture of defense [from me]. Not resentment, but defense.

Lately I’ve been working on a paper for a conference, and I’ve been fixated on an interview with an immigrant father. Juan (a pseudonym) is a Peruvian of Japanese descent who migrated from Peru to Japan more than 20 years ago. Juan expresses his frustration over what he sees as the lack of inclusion of Peruvians and other migrants from developing countries in Japan, in contrast to the greater openness to foreigners from the United States or Europe.

I don’t have a voice (in Japan), and I never will have it, because they (the Japanese) will never know what I think. But, in this…

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