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Posts Tagged ‘video’

Reblog from JAPANsociology–check out Megumi Nishikura’s TEDxKyoto talk on the Hafu film.

JAPANsociology

by Robert Moorehead

In September, filmmaker Megumi Nishikura gave a powerful, moving, and extremely personal presentation at TEDxKyoto. Her film, Hafu, is showing in theaters around the world, and offers an insightful look into the experiences of five hafu in Japan. The film opens in Kobe on November 23, and I can’t wait to see it.

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I touched on this in my post about cultural appropriation and Japan studies, but one of the reasons I got irritated in Japan with the constant “where are you from?” questions, was less for myself (I’m not from there) and more because it’s a burden that the children of my friends and coworkers raised exclusively in Japan have to bear (who may not “appear” to be “Japanese” at first glance, particularly if they’re multiracial). Addendum: I realize this post probably comes as flippant and ignoring the greater issues of being non-white and Japanese or multiracial and Japanese in Japan, especially given that time has passed since I originally wrote it and more people are now discussing this topic in relation to Ariana Miyamoto, Miss Japan 2015. In addition to her story, I’d like to also share some more recent articles on this: this article on “passing” and multiracial erasure in the US, and this one on the film Hafu: Mixed Race in Japan. And to note that, while there are negative stereotypes about white and white-appearing people, that white-appearing people often are associating with “benevolent” stereotypes, which, while problematic, are not nearly as damaging and dangerous as the negative stereotypes about Black people and people of Korean, Filipino, and Chinese descent (regardless of nationality) are.

Including stereotypes like this, from Toshiba's line of bread makers. Because white folks love bread, have big noses, and speak in katakana! Image via Japan Trends.

Including stereotypes like this, from Toshiba’s line of bread makers. Because white folks love bread, have huge noses, and speak in katakana! Image via Japan Trends.

Kanadajin3’s “White Japanese People – 白人系日本人” is video with commentary from several white people raised in Japan and the challenges they face as racial Others.   (more…)

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Mameshiba (豆しば)is one of my favorite short video series. In each 30-second episode, a bean of some sort–lentil, azuki, edamame–pops out of a diner’s food to convey a bit of trivia, the Japanese word for which is mame chishiki (豆知識), lit. bean knowledge. The facts are usually a bit awkward for the situation, like, “Female mantises eat male mantises.” Or, as the commenter lovelylexolicious writes for the prior video,

Storyline of mamashiba.
Random person is hungry, goes for a snack.
This random dog-like piece of food is found.
Mamashiba tells a random fact of trivia.
Person loses hunger and sets down mamashiba.
Mamashiba walks out like a BOSS!

You can watch all of the Mameshiba videos at the official site here or with English subtitles on the official site or on youtube.

Now, how does a Mameshiba celebrate Christmas?

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