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Posts Tagged ‘reblog’

As with many of the stories contained within Yoshiya’s Hana monogatari, “Yellow Roses” ends in tears. The story’s focus is not on plot, however, but rather the beauty of the two young women and the depth of their feelings for one another. Entire paragraphs are spent on detailed descriptions of mournful eyes and chiseled cheekbones, and the poetry of Sappho is quoted at length. As in the above passages, Yoshiya’s writing is characterized by fragments and ellipses, which heighten the emotional impact of certain scenes while leaving the reader free to fill in the suggestive gaps in the text with her imagination.

Contemporary Japanese Literature

Yellow Rose

Title: Yellow Rose
Japanese Title: 黄薔薇 (Kibara)
Author: Yoshiya Nobuko (吉屋 信子)
Translator: Sarah Frederick
Publication Year: 2014 (America); 1923 (Japan)
Publisher: Expanded Editions

I’m absolutely thrilled to write that one of Yoshiya Nobuko’s stories has finally appeared in a readily available English translation. “Yellow Rose” is drawn from Yoshiya’s acclaimed collection Hana monogatari (Flower Stories), which first appeared in print in the 1920s and has been a major guiding influence in shōjo manga, literature, and aesthetics. Thankfully, Yoshiya’s fiction is not just important from the perspective of literary history but also a true delight to read.

The short story “Yellow Rose” is about Katsuragi Misao, a twenty-two-year-old college graduate who accepts a teaching post at an all-girls prefectural academy “a thousand miles distant from Tokyo” to avoid getting married. On the train departing from Tokyo she meets Urakami Reiko, who happens to be a student entering her…

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My co-panelist Kathryn over at Contemporary Japanese Literature took the time out of her summer of research and writing to do a summary post of the essay version of our panel on cross-dressing, which I am reblogging here.

Some final notes: I have wanted to write about this topic for a long time, and Kathryn has been an incredible resource, motivator, sounding-board, supporter, and editor. It’s been a treat being her co-panelist and collaborator on this project. Since my own research lies in performing masculinities, I’ve enjoyed learning about performing femininities from her, and I hope we’ve been able to discuss effectively the pitfalls and triumphs of series that feature cross-dressing.

Kathryn’s own work in the field of gender and media studies is incredibly important, and her blog about Japanese literature in translation is a wonderful resource. Check it out here: http://japaneselit.net/

Contemporary Japanese Literature

This past April, the ever-amazing Leah of The Lobster Dance and I gave a panel on cross-dressing in anime and manga at Sakura-Con in Seattle. Because we had an enormous turnout and not enough time to say everything we wanted to say, we decided to expand our talk and post it online.

Our essay is meant to be friendly and welcoming to newcomers to the fascinating field of Gender Studies, but readers should be advised that some portions of this essay contain mild spoilers for the series under discussion. For those of you who are looking for recommendations for anime, manga, and formal academic scholarship, feel free to jump ahead to our conclusion in Part Seven.

Dan Savage Drawn by Ellen Forney

Part One
The Superpositionality of Gender

Gender plays a strong role in the life of each and every human individual from the moment of birth, even despite our difficulties in defining what “gender”…

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Great post introducing intersectional masculinities.

Inequality by (Interior) Design

By: C.J. Pascoe and Tristan Bridges

gwptwittericon2Originally posted at Girl W/ Pen

coverWhat it means to be masculine changes over time and from place to place.  After all, men used to wear dresses and high heels, take intimate pictures with one another and wear pink in childhood.  In our scholarship and blog posts we have been grappling with making sense of some of these more recent changes as we’ve watched (and contributed to) a discussion about what it means to be an ally and changing views on gender and sexual inequality—primarily among men (see here and here).  We recently published an article thinking through changes in contemporary definitions of masculinity allegedly occurring among a specific population of young, white, heterosexual men.

We sought to make sense of some complex issues like the contradiction between what seems like an “epidemic” of homophobic bullying alongside rising levels of support…

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A look the concepts of “semi-adapting” and racial place in society and in immigrant communities for a Nikkei Peruvian who migrated to Japan.

JAPANsociology

by Robert Moorehead

In all social processes, you have to have the word ‘inclusion’. … without that word, I’m not going to change the world, and they’re not going to change me, because they’re going to have that culture of defense [from me]. Not resentment, but defense.

Lately I’ve been working on a paper for a conference, and I’ve been fixated on an interview with an immigrant father. Juan (a pseudonym) is a Peruvian of Japanese descent who migrated from Peru to Japan more than 20 years ago. Juan expresses his frustration over what he sees as the lack of inclusion of Peruvians and other migrants from developing countries in Japan, in contrast to the greater openness to foreigners from the United States or Europe.

I don’t have a voice (in Japan), and I never will have it, because they (the Japanese) will never know what I think. But, in this…

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If you enjoyed the posts on Geek Girl Con, check out Terra Clarke Olsen’s new project:

Over the past few years, many people have written about females in the geek community, and how the group is often dismissed and overlooked. Although all this literature is important and valuable, we want to take it to the logical next step- to create an avenue that shows women are in the geek community. Lady geeks exist; we’re an important part of the geek community, and we’re not going to disappear.

The Unicorn Files aims to capture the diverse body of female geeks by photographing individual geek women, giving women in the community a chance to tell their story. The photos will represent them and what they love.

Have You Nerd

By: Terra Clarke Olsen

Hello lovely Have You Nerd readers! This post is a bit different. I am in search of volunteers for a new project I’m undertaking with a friend, and I need your help!

One of my dearest friends, Nate Watters, and I just launched a new project titled “The Unicorn Files: Debunking the Myth of Lady Geeks.” Our goal is to show that female geeks exist, and are a wide and diverse group.

Over the past few years, many people have written about females in the geek community, and how the group is often dismissed and overlooked. Although all this literature is important and valuable, we want to take it to the logical next step- to create an avenue that shows women are in the geek community. Lady geeks exist; we’re an important part of the geek community, and we’re not going to disappear.

The Unicorn…

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Some new resources from Make Me a Sammich: block the trolls, change the nouns, find the creepers, and knuckle down; Fight The Man each time you scroll–that’s how feminist toolbox rolls.

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I first noticed my spell-check was biased when Microsoft tried to tell me “heteronormative” wasn’t a word back in undergrad. (It’s underlined on this draft in WordPress now, “no replacements found.”) My phone doesn’t know “genderqueer,” “intersectionality,” or “biphobia.” Neither does the media, who continue to put gender identities and queer narratives in scare quotes, even when they’re supposedly “on our side” (see what I did there?).

Via homoarigato.

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