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Posts Tagged ‘A Man with Tea’

I’ve always been more interested in social and cultural histories than the “great man theory” or the model of “events, dates, models.” I especially like to learn about literature and media in the context of the culture and to show how quickly we forget how recent many trends and ways of thinking are–or how old some “new” ways of thinking are! Great discussion in the article and comments of what cultural history means.

上り口説 Nubui Kuduchi


This question came up in our research seminar today. I’d actually been thinking about it for awhile, as I consider myself a “cultural historian,” but when pressed, wasn’t actually sure exactly what I meant by that. And, perhaps more importantly, because we hear the term a lot, and I’m never quite sure that others are always using it in the same way. In a seminar last year, we read sections from Lynn Hunt’s The New Cultural History; we were told this was itself a seminal text in, or was representative of, the “cultural turn,” whatever that means. As with most Theory/Historiography books I’ve been assigned, I came out of it with little clear sense of what it was talking about. And so, finding this book to be dramatically different from my own understandings (or assumptions) as to what constituted “cultural history,” I began to wonder, What is Cultural History?

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Speaking of writing about studying another culture and having humility, check out Toranosuke’s excellent piece on the moment when you realize you how much you don’t know about your field over on A Man with Tea.

上り口説 Nubui Kuduchi

Whenever I’ve heard (or read) people say things like “the more you learn, the more you realize how little you know,” I always used to think it referred to a breadth and depth of detailed knowledge. The more you learn about Japan, the more you realize how little you know about England, the Netherlands, or Korea (not to mention Botswana or Guyana); at the same time, the more you learn about any given aspect of Japanese culture or history (for example), the more you realize just how many other castles, samurai lords, artists, events & incidents, works of literature, or whatever it may be, that you still don’t know about. Plus, even within any given topic, the more you know about Hokusai or Danjûrô or Saga Castle, for example, the more you realize just how much more about that same topic you still don’t know. That’s all certainly…

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