Advertisements
Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Kanazawa’ Category

On Sept. 22-23, Kanazawa’s Higashi Betsuin and Nishi Betsuin Temples are hosting a light-up with votive lanterns and hikari no objet (光のオブジェ), light-up objets d’art, some of which were displayed in last year’s Kanazawa Tsukimi Koro (金澤月見光路). Tsukimi Koro 2011 took place on the lawn between the Shiinoki Cultural Complex (しいのき迎賓館) and 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa, from Sept. 16-19, 2011. (See end for details on the October 2012 event!)

(more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

After my ajisai adventures in Kamakura, I decided to try my luck in Kanazawa. Kenrokuen, our most famous garden, shockingly has no hydrangeas! I didn’t go until late June, so I was a little late for iris season. However, I was able to capture this picture of a butterfly on one of the few remaining irises.

Dissatisfied with Kenrokuen (seriously, no hydrangeas?), I decided to try my flower-viewing luck at Utatsuyama’s iris garden (hanashôbuen, 花菖蒲園), which is located up the “mountain” (hill, really) of Utatsuyama, behind the Higashi Chaya-gai (東茶屋街).

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Plum blossoms in Kenrokuen. 6 April 2012.

I admire plum blossoms more than sakura on principle. Plum blossoms bloom in the last throes of winter, often surviving Ishikawa’s final snow storm. They smell sweeter and are more tenacious. There’s nothing sakura can do in form or shape that a plum can’t: they can be subtly tinged with pink or violently fuchsia; they can hang from delicate weeping boughs or bloom among thick, gnarled branches. But perhaps because of their staying power, taking several weeks to blossom fully, then remaining for another week or so before fading, they don’t induce the same joie de vivre that their more famous cousin, the cherry blossom, does.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

The area around Kanazawa Station(金沢駅) and the shopping districts of Kohrinbo (香林坊) and Tatemachi (竪町) are all aglow this month. It’s funny how some pretty LEDs can cheer you up about the typical Kanazawa winter weather–thundersnow (that deserves its own entry), clumpy snow, rain, sleet, hail, clouds, and all within the same hour.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Happy 100th post to me!

There’s a lot of Kanazawa that visitors don’t see. This is probably because the main roads, which are the bus routes, are easier to stick to when walking, particularly those that lead from the station to Kohrinbo and Katamachi, the heart of downtown. The narrow back streets, however, are much easier to use when biking, and biking everywhere in Kanazawa has really opened my eyes to this area I didn’t know existed.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts