Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Visual Culture’ Category

In this gender reader: more on Abenomics, Disney dimorphism, video games before gendered marketing, and more.

I have never met a person who could completely cover my hands in theirs. I'd be making that face, too. Image from Frozen via Family Inequality.

HULK SMASH YOUR DELICATE LADY HAND. Image from Frozen via Family Inequality.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Pre-holiday rush and year-end sexism burnout got you down? Let’s bring in some warm fuzzy feelings with an adorable mascot. We’ve got to take a cute break before continuing on our fun-ruining rampage through pop culture, right? All sarcasm aside, let me introduce you to my favorite Ishikawa mascot, Wakutama-kun, the soft-boiled onsen egg (温泉卵) of Wakura Onsen (和倉温泉).

 

Image from Wakura Onsen's website.

Image from Wakura Onsen‘s website.

 

(more…)

Read Full Post »

“It’s not that these colors are actually masculine or feminine…. The CIL paint campaign is a great example of how our collective investment in understanding gender and gender differences as natural and timeless is often casually presented in ways that reinforce our belief in that fiction.”

Inequality by (Interior) Design

By Tristan Bridges and Peter Rydzewski*

Colors are one way that the gender of different spaces can be communicated.  Pink and blue are the most identifiable, and recent research shows that men do seem to prefer blue (though, so do women).  Men’s aversion from pink, however, is stronger than women’s (though it’s also true that pink can be framed as masculine for select groups of men).  While this can feel timeless, like most aspects of gender, it hasn’t always been around.  And even when we began assigning gender to colors, pink was not always associated with girls.

Screen Shot 2013-11-14 at 9.47.02 PMJo B. Paoletti’s incredible history of children’s fashion in America—Pink and Blue: Telling the Boys from the Girls in America—is a beautifully written and carefully researched examination this strange issue.  Prior to the 1900s, children in America were dressed in ways that illustrated their age rather than gender (and…

View original post 848 more words

Read Full Post »

The spiritual companion of the Geek Girl Con panel “Changing Culture in Mainstream and Alternative Spaces” was a discussion of the problem of bullying in the cosplay community and possible solutions.

Via George Takei and Fandoms and Feminism.

Via George Takei and Fandoms and Feminism (full text).
Image: meme-maker accuses Duela Dent cosplayer of “trying too hard” in a “steampunk gender-swapped Joker in a Willy Wonka hat.” Tumblr users give the OP what for.

“A Community Divided: Bullying within the Cosplay Community and How to Solve the Problem”
From 4chan to Tumblr, the Internet has created an anonymous forum where belittling and trash talk have become the norm, and standing up for someone isn’t noble. In this panel we will be discussing the types of bullying prevalent in the cosplay community, the concept of “white knighting,” our own personal experiences with bullying, and how bullying is affecting attracting potential cosplayers. With panelists Christopher Vance, Erin Gose, Katie Murphy, Lauren Crosson, and Son Young Yu; moderated by Stephen Wilson.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Halloween! Let’s celebrate my favorite holiday with a (mostly positive) gender reader!

Source: wikimedia commons.

Source: Wikipedia.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

I usually focus on Japanese media on this blog, but I did a guest post over on Comparative Geeks today about queer American comic anthologies. Enjoy!

Comparative Geeks

Guest post by Leah of The Lobster Dance, a blog about Japan, gender, media, and culture (with a heavy dose of manga and geekery) and I’ll Make It Myself!a food blog.

People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect. But actually from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint it’s more like a big ball of wibbly-wobbly timey-wimey… stuff. — Doctor Who

“Wibbly-Wobbly, Sexy-Wexy”…: sexuality, like time, can be looked at from a “non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint.” —Anything That Loves, based on a comment at Comic Con

My taste in comics has always run a bit queer*of the center. If a comic has a sword-fighting woman or an androgynous character (or both at once if you please), I’ve probably read it. And much to the horror of misogynist nerds who think nerd girls do it for the ships (and what of it?!), the one thing guaranteed…

View original post 1,189 more words

Read Full Post »

I got a great comment from Maya on “Video: ‘White Japanese People – 白人系日本人'” about how mixed-race people living in Japan are also often treated as “foreigners,” and I wanted to share some recent links on that subject.

Image via The Diplomat.

Image via The Diplomat.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Aaand we’re a day or two late. ぎりぎりセーフ。。。じゃない。

I collected a lot of articles on geeks and gender this summer and wanted to share them here on the blog. Japan Gender Reader will be back soon!

Image via Northwest Press.

Image via Northwest Press.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Seattle is home to all sorts of interesting “niche” museums, and while I haven’t had a chance to see them all yet, I wanted to share with you my photos of the permanent exhibitions of the The Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience. Located in Seattle’s International District, the museum is the only pan-Asian museum in the US, and serves as both a look at the history of Asian immigration to the Pacific Northwest as well as a space to explore contemporary American identity politics.

The permanent exhibitions include biographical information on Wing Luke, who was born in China and immigrated to the US when he was 10. A WWII veteran, he was the first Asian-American elected to public office in the Pacific Northwest. He served on the Seattle city council until his death in a plane crash in 1965.

Wing Luke's biography.

Wing Luke’s biography.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

My friend Toranosuke over at the Japanese-art blog A Man With Tea has been looking for a good Japan-and-gender blog, something like a Japan-focused version of the excellent The Grand Narrative, which focuses mainly on Korea. My blog has a broader focus, but if I do occasional Gender Readers, why not do a Japan/Asia-specific one? Readers, if you have links or blog suggestions, please send them my way in the comments! よろしくお願いします.

via Contemporary Japanese Literature

(more…)

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »