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Posts Tagged ‘Gender’

Leah:

Great post introducing intersectional masculinities.

Originally posted on Inequality by (Interior) Design:

By: C.J. Pascoe and Tristan Bridges

gwptwittericon2Originally posted at Girl W/ Pen

coverWhat it means to be masculine changes over time and from place to place.  After all, men used to wear dresses and high heels, take intimate pictures with one another and wear pink in childhood.  In our scholarship and blog posts we have been grappling with making sense of some of these more recent changes as we’ve watched (and contributed to) a discussion about what it means to be an ally and changing views on gender and sexual inequality—primarily among men (see here and here).  We recently published an article thinking through changes in contemporary definitions of masculinity allegedly occurring among a specific population of young, white, heterosexual men.

We sought to make sense of some complex issues like the contradiction between what seems like an “epidemic” of homophobic bullying alongside rising levels of support…

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In this edition of the gender reader: queer issues in the Tohoku Disaster recovery, the Global Gender Gap Report 2013, why the “economics of sex” video is wrong, wrong, wrong, and more!

3 out of 4 women agree: "Not a feminist? Get out of my bed." (Via Business Insider, originally from The Economics of Sex)

Let’s reclaim this image. “Sorry, bro, the goddesses have spoken. Misogynists don’t get sex OR vintage NES time.” (Via Business Insider, originally from The Economics of Sex by the Austin Institute)

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Ooku, Vol. 8, p. 188. Yoshimune and Hisamichi

Vol. 8, p. 188. Yoshimune and Hisamichi

I know most of my readers are familiar with Yoshinaga Fumi’s Ôoku, but in case you’re new here or would like to recommend the manga to a friend, I wrote a guest post over on Have You Nerd? introducing the English-version of the manga.

In 1716, Tokugawa Yoshimune, the great-granddaughter of the first Tokugawa shogun, become shogun herself, despite being the third daughter of a branch family and having a low-ranking concubine as a father. During her reign as Shogun, Yoshimune enacted a number of reforms, though she maintained Japan’s closed-country status for fear of a foreign invasion if anyone learned that the country was actually run by women.

Not the version of Japanese history you learned in school? Then get thee to a purveyor of fine manga, for you have much to study.

Full article: “History Lessons from the Tokugawa Matriarchy: Ôoku: The Inner Chambers” on Have You Nerd?

If you’d like to read my more in-depth analyses of the Japanese version, check out my Ôoku category here on the blog or start here.

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Leah:

“‘If these men face no consequences for their actions – indeed, if they are able to press charges against Roy for publicly addressing their comments – what are the students going to learn from this? They’ll learn that rape is a joke, that women can be terrorized into silence, and that it’s useless, maybe even dangerous, to speak up. Are these the lessons that we want our student leaders to be instilling in the heads of seventeen and eighteen year old kids?’”

Originally posted on Make Me a Sammich:

Trigger warning for discussion of rape and rape culture.

Screen shot 2014-03-03 at 2.59.43 PMMy friend Anne Thériault of The Belle Jarwrote a post a few days ago about an incident at University of Ottawa wherein several male members of student leadership gathered to chat about Anne Marie Roy, president of the Student Federation of the University of Ottawa. Ms. Roy had apparently beaten a dude for the office, and these dudes were not happy. They went on for several screens talking about how someone should “punish her with their shaft,” speculating about what venereal diseases she might have, and offering to buy beers for a guy who says he’s going to “fuck her in the ass” on someone’s desk. You’ll find the whole disgusting mess over on The Belle Jar. Here’s an excerpt from Anne’s article, which you should go read right now.

Someone punish her with their shaft. Someone punish her with…

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Leah:

“Although this video may be challenging gender inequality, it does so at the expense of upholding racist ideologies about France’s Other.”

Originally posted on :

Jafar_blogimage2 The short film, “ Oppressed Majority ” by French director Éléonore Pourriat is a powerful video showing a reversed reality: a society where women and men have traded places and experiences.  The 10-minute film shows a day in the life of Pierre, who is a father and a husband, going about his day.  From unwanted attention, to harassment, to assault, the film details his experiences with women (who are the harassers and the attackers). The film does an excellent job of revealing the sexism, threats, and attacks that women deal with everyday, and the absurdity of the responses they have to deal with in light of such experiences.  One can see the tentativeness with which Pierre walks, the discomfort and shame he feels with the unwanted attention and harassment and the downright trauma of having been sexually assaulted.  In brief, the film is able to visually capture what it’s like…

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In this gender reader: the gendered politics of skin-whitening creams; public bathing; bad reporting on the “sex strike”; Facebook genders; and more–and I even think we can get through this without a discussion of giri-choco!

Chanel's Le Blanc (ルブラン) skin-whitening cream. Image via Chanel Japan.

Chanel’s Le Blanc (ルブラン) skin-whitening cream. Image via Chanel Japan.

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Happy Valentine’s Day! I hope you enjoy the final tragic episode of Ôoku: Tanjô, a.k.a. a preponderance of nope. This recap contains (major) spoilers for the drama and the manga. Episode 9 recap here; manga analysis hereÔoku category (film, manga, and drama) here.

Aired Dec. 14, 2012 on TBS.

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Leah:

Some new resources from Make Me a Sammich: block the trolls, change the nouns, find the creepers, and knuckle down; Fight The Man each time you scroll–that’s how feminist toolbox rolls.

Originally posted on Make Me a Sammich:

FKTB.pngAs we’re all probably aware by now, the Internet is a jungle of rape culture, blatant misogyny, and the insidious messages of patriarchy. What’s a Feminist Killjoy to do?

Make tools to fight the BS. And use them.

I give you the Make Me a Sammich Feminist Killjoy Toolbox: a living collection of tools created to turn the Internet into a safer, more hospitable, or just more interesting and enlightening environment for Feminist Killjoys everywhere. I’ll start with a few I’ve learned about recently and add to the list as more become available (or I become aware of them). Know of a tool I should list here? Let me know in the comments section.

The Block Bot

The Block Bot is a Twitter-specific tool that auto-blocks people who engage in anti-feminist trolling behavior. It’s customizable, using “nastiness levels” to let you choose how aggressively you want it to protect…

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Leah:

I first noticed my spell-check was biased when Microsoft tried to tell me “heteronormative” wasn’t a word back in undergrad. (It’s underlined on this draft in WordPress now, “no replacements found.”) My phone doesn’t know “genderqueer,” “intersectionality,” or “biphobia.” Neither does the media, who continue to put gender identities and queer narratives in scare quotes, even when they’re supposedly “on our side” (see what I did there?).

Via homoarigato.

Originally posted on Mik Everett's Blog:

“I read a headline today:
“Preferred” Pronouns Gain Traction at US Colleges.
and I couldn’t help but think
even when we get a victory
we’re still prisoners of punctuation.
Trapped in quotations, like the air-quotes
that mocked me in seventh grade
when I wore boy’s clothes to school
and no one said I wore “boy” clothes to school.
No one mocked the gendered shoes.
No air-quotes around my flannel button-down shirt
marketed for males only. The quotes go around
things like “normal” instead. Punctuation trapped
words I chose for myself. Like normal.
Like my name.
Quotes around words like “intersectionality”
and “genderqueer” and “pansexual” in the newspaper
because even when they concede to using our words
they have to make sure we know
they don’t really believe it.
The little red line on my computer screen reminds me
they’re just humoring “us”
and our made-up “words”
highlighted with quotations
that…

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If you missed it last month, Miri of Brute Reason (Free Thought Blogs) has a post on how critiquing flaws in our theories can lead to a stronger, more holistic approach to discussing gender, culture, and feminism. I was initially a bit worried about the “devil’s advocate” position mentioned in the caveats because when I experience that position with critiquing (current) feminist theory, it tends to come with a tip of the fedora. However, this is the right sort of challenging and engaging and comes from a place of hoping to better the field.

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