Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Culture’ Category

Live On: Mr.’s Japanese Neo-Pop at the Seattle Asian Art Museum is, to use an old slang term, frantic. My friend and museum companion hadn’t been through the permanent collection yet, and after an hour or so of contemplating mainly contemporary ink pieces, delicate snuff bottles, and lavishly detailed Persian paintings set in the elegant art deco building, we arrived at the eye-popping, jarringly neon moé world of Mr.’s neo-pop art.

MAKING THINGS RIGHT, 2006, MR., JAPANESE, B.1969, ACRYLIC ON CANVAS, 118 X 177 IN., © 2006 MR./KAIKAI KIKI CO., LTD., ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, PHOTO COURTESY GALERIE PERROTIN.

MAKING THINGS RIGHT, 2006, MR., JAPANESE, B.1969, ACRYLIC ON CANVAS, 118 X 177 IN., © 2006 MR./KAIKAI KIKI CO., LTD., ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, PHOTO COURTESY GALERIE PERROTIN. via Seattle Asian Art Museum

(more…)

Read Full Post »

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about how the ways in which marginalized geeks (women/nonbinary people, queer individuals, people of color, people with disabilities, et al.) interact with fandom. In particular, I’ve been thinking about how creative expressions of love (such as fanworks and cosplay) for media are treated poorly by society in general as well as individuals in their lives. (Specifically, of how individual straight male geeks fear that others’–particularly their female partners’–interests in shipping, crossplay, etc., somehow invalidates their delicate grasp on cultural masculinity.)

At Geek Girl Con, I attended an amazing panel of “Geek Elders” who told us all about female Star Trek fandom and making Kirk/Spock ‘zines in the 1960s and 70s–how many of these women’s husbands felt their participation in fandom detracted from their care of the home and children. How one of their colleague’s husband’s tried to have her committed. 

What I’ve learned, not just from this panel, but from years of reading about our geek forbears, is that we’ve always been here. We’re not going anywhere. On that note, I present a gender reader of geekery, with a very special Christmas song at the end!

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Dear readers, my apologies: November has been a lousy month for writing. A lot of personal issues are eating up all my time, and I hope to get to some of that backlog of posting in December. That said, I headed out for my annual momiji-gari (紅葉狩り, “fall foliage hunting”) at the Seattle Japanese Garden on Nov. 9 (2013 post here). Getting “out” into nature, even just to the Arboretum and the Japanese Garden, is something I didn’t get to do often enough last year. But a new year is coming, and I am resolving to make nature part of my self-care regime again, like it was in the first few years in Japan.

Seattle Japanese Garden 2014 | I'll Make It Myself! 2

 

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Every blog I follow seems to be covering problematic costumes this week, and you’ve still got one day to read up before the big day! Racist, sexist, fatphobic, transphobic, and appropriative costumes like these don’t have a place in Halloween fun. Let’s see what’s trending this year!

Via Jezebel

Via Jezebel

Warning: these links are about costumes that are, as stated, racist, sexist, fatphobic, transphobic, and appropriative; and include discussions of domestic violence, medical trauma, etc. (Also: tastelessness.)

(more…)

Read Full Post »

IMG_0597We’ve discussed gender and female movie monsters, but which monsters are often coded as masculine? Stinekey on Lady Geek Girl discusses werewolves:

Vampires might represent a powerful person draining us of our own power for personal gain. Zombies drawn on our fear of pandemics and the ignorant masses destroying those of us just trying to survive. But what about werewolves? The most common answer I find is that werewolves speak to the changes a teenager experiences during puberty. Pisces already explored how this dynamic works in Teen Wolf. But if that’s the case, then where are all the female werewolves?

 

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Quick video link today via Buzzfeed’s “If Women In Horror Films Were Played By Men.” (Video is slightly NSFW.)

(more…)

Read Full Post »

IMG_0597In the course of doing this series of posts, I discovered Bitch Flicks and BJ Colangelo of Day of the Woman in my search for feminist horror analysis by horror fans. Today, I’d like to share with you Colangelo’s post  “Women with Disabilities: The Undiscussed Horror Staple of Female Characters,” which discusses the trope of how and why women characters with disabilities are used as plot devices.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 634 other followers